ARCENCPostings

Tuesday, December 12, 2017

Tutankhamun archaeologist's London flat on sale for £9.75m | Daily Mail Online


http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-5170739/Flat-Tutankhamun-archaeologist-lived-sale.html

The house that King Tut bought... and now it's up for a pharaoh price tag! Lavish five-bedroom apartment archaeologist Howard Carter lived in after discovery of Tutankhamun's tomb goes on sale for £9.75million

  • British archaeologist Howard Carter lived at apartment from when he retired in 1932 until he died in 1939 
  • His discovery of Tutankhamun's tomb in 1922 hailed as biggest archaeological achievement of 20th century
  • He made an estimated £15m from the King Tut treasures which work out at £600m in today's money
  • Kensington apartment also used as RAF base during World War II and film set for 1978 remake of The 39 Steps
  • Grade II listed building, a stone's throw from the Royal Albert Hall, has gone on the market for £9.75million
A five-bedroom apartment originally bought with money from the King Tutankhamun treasures has gone up for sale.

British archaeologist Howard Carter purchased the lavish mansion-block building, which is just a stone's throw away from the Royal Albert Hall in Kensington, when he returned home from Egypt after discovering the tomb of King Tut. 

The lavish property in west London is on the market for £9.75million. 

Carter moved into the flat in Albert Court when he retired from archaeology in 1932 after making an estimated £15million from his excavation in Egypt - which is around £600m in today's money. 

He lived in the flat until his death in 1939.

His discovery of the pharaoh in 1922 was hailed as the biggest archaeological triumph of the 20th century.

The plush £9.75m flat, located in Albert Court in                Kensington, London, is the former home of Howard Carter -                the man who discovered the tomb of Tutankhamun in 1922.                His discovery was hailed as the biggest archaeological                triumph of the 20th century

The plush £9.75m flat, located in Albert Court in Kensington, London, is the former home of Howard Carter - the man who discovered the tomb of Tutankhamun in 1922. His discovery was hailed as the biggest archaeological triumph of the 20th century

Carter moved in to the mansion-block building in                Albert Court after he returned from Egypt in 1932 when the                excavation of King Tut's tomb was complete. Although it                was discovered in 1922 it took a decade to extract the                contents of the tomb

Carter moved in to the mansion-block building in Albert Court after he returned from Egypt in 1932 when the excavation of King Tut's tomb was complete. Although it was discovered in 1922 it took a decade to extract the contents of the tomb

The Albert Court building is brimming with history,                having been used as an RAF base during World War II and as                a film set for the award-winning 1978 remake of spy                thriller The 39 Steps, which was originally directed by                Alfred Hitchcock

The Albert Court building is brimming with history, having been used as an RAF base during World War II and as a film set for the award-winning 1978 remake of spy thriller The 39 Steps, which was originally directed by Alfred Hitchcock

Work on the Grade II listed building, which is next                to the Royal Albert Hall, began in 1890, the year before                Carter left for Egypt. Above is one of the five bedrooms                in the property

Work on the Grade II listed building, which is next to the Royal Albert Hall, began in 1890, the year before Carter left for Egypt. Above is one of the five bedrooms in the property

Albert Court is one of London's first purpose-built                mansion blocks. Above, one of the building's several                upstairs lounge areas

Albert Court is one of London's first purpose-built mansion blocks. Above, one of the building's several upstairs lounge areas

The Albert Court building is brimming with history too, having been used as an RAF base during the Second World War and as a film set for the 1978 remake of spy thriller The 39 Steps - which was originally directed by Alfred Hitchcock. 

Work on the Grade II listed building, which is one of London's first purpose-built mansion blocks, began in 1890, the year before Carter left for Egypt.

Carter was hired by English aristocrat Lord Carnarvon to lead an excavation of Egyptian nobles' tombs in 1907.

He received a licence to dig at the Valley of the Kings in 1914 but it wasn't until November 1922 that he and his team uncovered a flight of steps leading to King Tutankhamun's tomb. 

Howard Carter was born in 1874 and grew up in                Kensington. He first went to Egypt as a young artist hired                to sketch artifacts. He sparked a relationship with                aristocrat Lord Carnarvon around 1907. The pair would                eventually combine to discover King Tut's tomb

Howard Carter was born in 1874 and grew up in Kensington. He first went to Egypt as a young artist hired to sketch artifacts. He sparked a relationship with aristocrat Lord Carnarvon around 1907. The pair would eventually combine to discover King Tut's tomb

Carter went on to become an important archaeologist                and the lead excavator of the tomb of King Tutankhamun.                Above the archaeologist is photographed with the coffin of                King Tut in The Valley Of The Kings, Egypt in 1925

Carter went on to become an important archaeologist and the lead excavator of the tomb of King Tutankhamun. Above the archaeologist is photographed with the coffin of King Tut in The Valley Of The Kings, Egypt in 1925

Carter's crew found a flight of steps that led down                to a sealed door and a secret chamber. On November 26,                1922, Carter entered the tomb where he found an immense                collection of gold and treasures

Carter's crew found a flight of steps that led down to a sealed door and a secret chamber. On November 26, 1922, Carter entered the tomb where he found an immense collection of gold and treasures

The immense wealth of artifacts and treasures found                in King Tut's tomb took a decade to excavate but Carter                remained in Egypt working on the site until it was                finished in 1932

The immense wealth of artifacts and treasures found in King Tut's tomb took a decade to excavate but Carter remained in Egypt working on the site until it was finished in 1932

Carter was hired by English aristocrat Lord Carnarvon                to lead an excavation of Egyptian nobles' tombs in 1907.                Carter was on his last sponsored season when he made the                great discovery. Above, Carter wraps up one of the two                statues of King Tut for removal in 1923

Carter was hired by English aristocrat Lord Carnarvon to lead an excavation of Egyptian nobles' tombs in 1907. Carter was on his last sponsored season when he made the great discovery. Above, Carter wraps up one of the two statues of King Tut for removal in 1923

The pharaoh's sarcophagus had been undisturbed for more than 3,000 years and the burial chamber was filled with more than 5,000 artefacts. 

Clearing out the tomb took nearly ten years.

Afterwards Carter retired from archaeology he returned to London and lived in Albert Court until his death in 1939.

The flat in Albert Court was used by the RAF during the Second World War to house airmen learning how to use and maintain RAF radio equipment. 

The apartment, which was originally two flats, is set                over the first and second floors and has more than 4,340                sq ft of accommodation. In 1978 it was used as a film                location when it doubled as Richard Hannay's apartment in                the remake of The 39 Steps

The apartment, which was originally two flats, is set over the first and second floors and has more than 4,340 sq ft of accommodation. In 1978 it was used as a film location when it doubled as Richard Hannay's apartment in the remake of The 39 Steps

Howard Carter moved in to the flat when he retired                from archaeology in 1932 following his great discovery of                King Tut's tomb. It would turn out to be his final place                of residence

Howard Carter moved in to the flat when he retired from archaeology in 1932 following his great discovery of King Tut's tomb. It would turn out to be his final place of residence

The five-bedded apartment was used by the RAF during                the World War II to house airmen learning how to use and                maintain RAF radio equipment

The five-bedded apartment was used by the RAF during the World War II to house airmen learning how to use and maintain RAF radio equipment

Howard Carter and the discovery of King Tut's tomb

  • Carter and his sponsor spent season after season hunting for Tutankhamun's tomb until Lord Carnarvon gave up hope and returned to Britain - Carter, however, would not give up and persuaded his patron for a last chance
  • On November 4, 1922, a boy who worked as a water fetcher on the excavation started to dig in the sand with a stick and he found a stone step before calling Carter over
  • Carter's crew found a flight of steps that led down to a sealed door and a secret chamber 
  • On November 26, 1922, Carter entered the tomb, where he found an immense collection of gold and treasures
  • On February 16, 1923, Carter opened the innermost chamber and found the coffin of King Tut
  • The discovery made a huge impact as King Tut's tomb was by far the most intact of all the tombs that were excavated, and the artifacts were well-preserved, including the coffin and Tut's mummy
  • An interest in ancient Egypt and Egyptology was sparked around the world and remains at large today thanks to the uncovered tomb of Tutankhamun
  • The immense wealth of artifacts and treasures found in King Tut's tomb took a decade to excavate but Carter remained in Egypt working on the site until it was completed in 1932
  • Carter returned to London and spent the remainder of his years in the Albert Court flat 
  • He died in London on March 2, 1939, of lymphoma

Source: Biography.com 

In 1978 it was used as a film location when it doubled as Richard Hannay's apartment in the remake of The 39 Steps.

The flat, which was originally two flats, is set over the first and second floors and has more than 4,340 sq ft of accommodation.

The upper floor has a double reception room with 13ft high ceilings, intricate cornices, a fireplace and chandeliers - as well as a sleek kitchen and a balcony overlooking the Royal College of Music.

There is a book-lined study, guest bedroom with en-suite, an office and a bathroom also on the upper floor with a master bedroom suite and two more bedrooms on the lower floor.

Carter grew up in Kensington, so it was fitting that                he spent the remainder of his retired life there.  He died                in London on March 2, 1939, of lymphoma

Carter grew up in Kensington, so it was fitting that he spent the remainder of his retired life there.  He died in London on March 2, 1939, of lymphoma

Leo Russell, from estate agents Russell Simpson,                said: 'The apartment itself is one of the finest on the                market. The ceiling heights, grand proportions and                exquisite interiors are reminiscent of a time gone by and                we expect it to attract a lot of attention'

Leo Russell, from estate agents Russell Simpson, said: 'The apartment itself is one of the finest on the market. The ceiling heights, grand proportions and exquisite interiors are reminiscent of a time gone by and we expect it to attract a lot of attention'

Work on the Grade II listed building, which is next                to the Royal Albert Hall, began in 1890, the year before                Carter left for Egypt. There is a book-lined study, guest                bedroom with en suite, an office and a bathroom also on                the upper floor with a master bedroom suite and two more                bedrooms on the lower floor

Work on the Grade II listed building, which is next to the Royal Albert Hall, began in 1890, the year before Carter left for Egypt. There is a book-lined study, guest bedroom with en suite, an office and a bathroom also on the upper floor with a master bedroom suite and two more bedrooms on the lower floor

The upper floor has a double reception room with 13ft                high ceilings, intricate cornicing, a fireplace and                chandeliers, as well as a sleek kitchen and a balcony                overlooking the Royal College of Music

The upper floor has a double reception room with 13ft high ceilings, intricate cornicing, a fireplace and chandeliers, as well as a sleek kitchen and a balcony overlooking the Royal College of Music

Residents also have a first-class concierge and                security service in the lobby, but as well as the £9.75m                price tag the new owners would also have to pay £28,000 a                year service charges

Residents also have a first-class concierge and security service in the lobby, but as well as the £9.75m price tag the new owners would also have to pay £28,000 a year service charges

Residents also have a first-class concierge and security service in the lobby, but as well as the £9.75m price tag the new owners would also have to pay £28,000 a year service charges.

Leo Russell, from estate agents Russell Simpson, said: 'Albert Court is one of London's finest residential buildings. 

The building is absolutely brimming with history.

'Not only has it housed many famous residents over the years, but it has also been used as a film set and as an RAF base during World War II.

'The apartment itself is one of the finest on the market. 

'The ceiling heights, grand proportions and exquisite interiors are reminiscent of a time gone by and we expect it to attract a lot of attention.'

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