ARCENCPostings

Monday, May 3, 2021

Concepts Kyrie 7 “Horus” and “Feather of Maat” Collection | HYPEBEAST

https://hypebeast.com/2021/5/concepts-kyrie-7-horus-and-feather-of-maat-collection

Concepts Unveils Nike Kyrie 7 "Horus" and "Feather of Maat" Collection

https://image-cdn.hypb.st/https%3A%2F%2Fhypebeast.com%2Fimage%2F2021%2F05%2Fconcepts-kyrie-7-horus-and-feather-of-maat-collection-1.jpg?q=90&w=1400&cbr=1&fit=max

https://image-cdn.hypb.st/https%3A%2F%2Fhypebeast.com%2Fimage%2F2021%2F05%2Fconcepts-kyrie-7-horus-and-feather-of-maat-collection-2.jpg?q=90&w=1400&cbr=1&fit=max


https://hypebeast.com/image/2021/05/concepts-kyrie-7-horus-and-feather-of-maat-collection-21.jpg

Apparel, accessories and footwear inspired by Egyptian archaeology.

Concepts recently announced its latest collaboration with Kyrie Irving and his sister Asia on a new collection called "Feather of Maat" alongside a new partnership with Nike (NYSE:NKE +0.31%) on the Kyrie 7 silhouette entitled "Horus." The joint release was inspired by Irving's personal fascinations with Egyptian archeology, rituals and symbolism with graphic elements found across apparel, accessories and the collaborative footwear option.

"The mysteries of ancient Egypt are a source of endless fascination for Kyrie," said Concepts in a statement. For instance, the Kyrie 7 "Horus" gleans visual cues from glazed ceramics discovered in ancient Egypt. Moreover, blue hues throughout the multidimensional upper draw inspiration from tones of artifacts, and Egyptian symbols that are worked into the forefoot bands, heel, and Swoosh elements.

Coinciding with the sneaker is the "Feather of Maat" collection which continues to reference Egyptian archaeology such as rich turquoises and teals that recall Egyptian Faience. Contrasting those tones is an array of orange gradients that evoke "the desert sands fading into the sky before nightfall," the label added. "Symbols like the Ankh and Lotus flower — each reflecting the cycle of life — appear on crewnecks, hoodies, sweatpants, socks and T-shirts."

"This collection represents an evolution of the Concepts' brand. Our new apparel program allows us to take our storytelling full circle. The Ankh Crewneck is a piece we're really proud of — there are over 100,000 stitches in the embroidery — and is evidence of how we'll continue to explore fabrication as we grow," said Deon Point, Concepts' Creative Director, in a statement.

Check out the Nike Kyrie 7 "Horus" and "Feather of Maat" collection above and expect an official release for both on Concepts' website and stores starting May 7 at 11 a.m. EST.

Elsewhere in fashion, Supreme is officially opening a store in Milan on May 6.

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American Research Center in Egypt May 2021 Virtual Events


ARCE Don't Forget to Register!

 

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May 2021 virtual Events

*Members Only*

May 9, 2021

1PM EDT/ 7PM EET

Register Now

Sacred Baboons as engines of Egyptian trade and seafaring 

with Dr. Nathaniel Dominy 

This talk will focus on the bones and teeth of mummified baboons recovered from New Kingdom temples and Ptolemaic tombs. The isotope composition of these tissues is a valuable source of information about the life and lifeways of an animal. In some cases, our evidence points to captive breeding and a lifetime spent in Egypt. In other cases, we find evidence of importation from distant lands. So far, this evidence corroborates consensus on the location of Punt, putting it in the modern-day countries of Eritrea and northern Somalia.


 

*Public Access*

May 20, 2021 Hosted by ARCE 

Starts at 7 AM GMT

Register Now

Egypt and the Mediterranean World from the Late Fourth through the Third Millennium BCE Conference

ARCE is sponsoring this conference and is Hosting Day 2

*This is NOT an ARCE National Lecture

This conference will bring together the latest research on the interaction between Egypt and the Levantine and Aegean worlds in the late fourth – third millennium BCE. The event will be held on four days in May. Each  conference day will consist of two sessions of four 20min papers followed by a discussionRegistration is free for all presenters and attendees. All attendees and presenters must register to be accepted into the event and must register for each date separately.

To view each day of the conference, click HERE.


 

*Public Access*

May 29, 2021

1PM EDT/ 7PM EET

Register Now

Egyptian History and its Many Cuisines: An Exploration of Egyptian Food History 

with Dr. Mennat-Allah El Dorry

This lecture also includes a drink recipe to be made prior to the lecture and enjoyed during the Q&A. 

Click HERE for the recipe. 

This talk will explore the cuisines of each phase of Egyptian history, identifying some of the highlights or developments of each time period, starting with ancient Egypt and through to the 20th century. It will also investigate the transformations, and how these may or may not have had an impact on the face of today's Egyptian food.

Thursday, April 29, 2021

A Pregnant Ancient Egyptian Mummy Has Been Discovered in a Shocking World First

https://www.sciencealert.com/scientists-have-identified-the-world-s-first-ever-pregnant-embalmed-egyptian-mummy


Photo and scans of the mummy. (Ejsmond et al., J. Archaeol. Sci., 2021)

A Pregnant Ancient Egyptian Mummy Has Been Discovered in a Shocking World First

30 APRIL 2021

At first, archaeologists thought they were scanning the mummy of an ancient Egyptian priest named Hor-Djehuty. Then, in the body's abdomen, images revealed what appeared to be the bones of a tiny foot.

Full scans confirmed it: the foot belonged to a tiny fetus, still in the womb of its deceased and mummified mother.

Not only is this the first time a deliberately mummified pregnant woman has been found, it presents a fascinating mystery. Who was the woman? And why was she mummified with her fetus? So peculiar is the discovery, scientists have named her the Mysterious Lady of the National Museum in Warsaw.

"For unknown reasons, the fetus had not been removed from the abdomen during the mummification," archaeologist Wojciech Ejsmond of the Polish Academy of Sciences told Science in Poland.

"For this reason, the mummy is really unique. Our mummy is the only one identified so far in the world with a fetus in the womb."

The mummy and its sarcophagus were donated to the University of Warsaw in 1826 and kept in the National Museum in Warsaw, Poland since 1917. The artifact actually has an interesting history. The mummy was initially thought to be female, likely because of the elaborate sarcophagus.

mummy setThe coffin, cartonnage case, and mummy. (National Museum in Warsaw, Warsaw Mummy Project)

It wasn't until around 1920 when the name on the coffin and cartonnage was translated that perception shifted. The writing revealed that the interred was named Hor-Djehuty, and was highly placed.

"Scribe, priest of Horus-Thoth worshiped as a visiting deity in the Mount of Djeme, royal governor of the town of Petmiten, Hor-Djehuty, justified by voice, son of Padiamonemipet and lady of a house Tanetmin," the translation read.

In 2016, however, computer tomography revealed that the mummy in the sarcophagus may not have actually been Hor-Djehuty. The bones were too delicate, male reproductive organs were missing, and a three-dimensional reconstruction revealed breasts.

Given that artifacts weren't exactly handled with the best care in the 19th century, and given that the coffin and cartonnage were indeed made for a male mummy, it seems that an entirely different mummy was placed in the sarcophagus at some point - perhaps to be passed off as a more valuable artifact.

This is supported by damage to some of the mummy's bandages - likely caused by 19th century looters rifling through looking for amulets, the researchers said.

Thus, it's impossible to know who exactly the woman was, or even if she came from Thebes where the coffin was found; however, a few facts can be gauged from her remains.

Firstly, she was mummified with great care, and with a rich set of amulets, suggesting in and of itself that she was someone important - mummification was a luxury in ancient Egypt, unavailable to most.

abdominalX-ray and CT scans of the mummy's abdomen, revealing the fetus. (Ejsmond et al., J. Archaeol. Sci., 2021)

She died just over 2,000 years ago, in approximately the first century BCE, between the ages of 20 and 30, and the development of the fetus suggests she was between 26 and 30 weeks pregnant.

As the first-ever discovery of a pregnant embalmed mummy, the Mysterious Lady poses fascinating questions about ancient Egyptian spiritual beliefs, the researchers said. Did the ancient Egyptians believe that unborn fetuses could go on to the afterlife, or was this mummy a strange anomaly?

It's unclear how she died, but the team believes that analysis of the mummy's preserved soft tissues might yield some clues.

"High mortality during pregnancy and childbirth in those times is not a secret," Ejsmond said. "Therefore, we believe that pregnancy could somehow contribute to the death of the young woman."

The team's research has been published in the Journal of Archaeological Science.

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Journal of Near Eastern Studies: Press release

https://www.journals.uchicago.edu/journals/jnes/pr/210419

New evidence of the importance of the Roman/Byzantine Mons Smaragdus settlement within the emerald mining network

A new paper published in the Journal of Near Eastern Studies presents the results of and images from the resuming of the archaeological seasons in the Mons Smaragdus region in the Egyptian Eastern Desert. The region is known for Roman-era emerald mines, chronicled by authors like Pliny the Elder and Claudius Ptolemy, were rediscovered in the 19th century by the French mineralogist Fréderic Cailliaud. During the 1990s a team from the "Berenike Project" started to survey the area and conducted the first excavations, focusing on the main site identified, Sikait, where the archaeological seasons resumed in January of 2018 and January 2020.

The Large Temple of Sikait seen from the wadi                  floor.

In "New evidence regarding emerald production in Roman Egypt coming from Wadi Sikait (Eastern Desert)" authors J. Oller Guzmán, D. Fernández Abella, V. Trevín Pita, O. Achon Casas, and S. García-Dils de la Vega detail what was found in three buildings. The first structure, referred to as the "Administrative building," was likely a temple long occupied between the 1st and the 4th-5th centuries. Nineteen coins were recovered at the site, along with other items indicating ritual use like incense burners and bronze and steatite figurines. The "Large Temple," one of the most well-preserved structures standing in Sikait, also contained religious artifacts like bones, terracotta body parts, and amulets, and was likely occupied between the 4th and the 5th centuries AD, although inner shrines were possibly used earlier, based on surviving traces of Egyptian hieroglyph and other materials. Finally, the "Six Windows Building" complex, possibly a residential space, included an older inner cavity, which may have been related to mining activity. However, concerning this type of structures, common in Sikait, the authors write, "After analyzing most of these spaces, we can conclude that almost none of them can be identified as beryl mines, and mainly we are dealing with storage or living spaces." Nevertheless, the study of the underground structures presents in Sikait and the surrounding areas allowed the documentation of several beryl mining spaces. The detailed analysis of some mines showed relevant evidence concerning their structure, typology, and evolution, including the discovery of the first register inscription ever found in an ancient emerald mine.

These excavation seasons, the authors write, add to knowledge about emerald production in Roman Egypt. "First, it confirmed the significance of the religious aspect in mining settlements like ancient Senskis." This shows the importance of the settlement within the emerald mining network, as there is no other site in which a similar concentration of cult spaces has been recorded. "This links Sikait to other productive regions in the Eastern Desert, which also offer plentiful evidence of the importance of cult and religion, like the imperial quarries."

The authors propose this work will provide key evidence in the future for determining how exactly were the mines exploited. Future seasons will focus on documenting the mining complexes to get a complete overview of the process of extraction and commercialization of emeralds, which will provide greater historical context. "According to literary sources such as Olympiodorus, in the 5th century AD a permit from the king of the Blemmyes was required to enter the emerald mines." Considering that most of the surviving structures in Sikait date to this period, archaeological information from such sites are fundamental for understanding the progressive abandonment of the Roman/Byzantine control in this area and the gradual substitution by the Blemmyan power.

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Wednesday, April 28, 2021

Scientists Find First Evidence on Dental Surgeries in Ancient Egypt | Asharq AL-awsat

https://english.aawsat.com/home/article/2943781/scientists-find-first-evidence-dental-surgeries-ancient-egypt

Scientists Find First Evidence on Dental Surgeries in Ancient Egypt

Wednesday, 28 April, 2021 - 05:30

Scientists Find First Evidence on Dental Surgeries in Ancient Egypt

Wednesday, 28 April, 2021 - 05:30
Archaeologists remove the cover of an intact sarcophagus inside a tomb in Luxor, Egypt. Reuters file photo

A virtual autopsy of the Osirmose's mummy, the doorkeeper of the Temple of Re, revealed several medical interventions in the mouth area that likely took place throughout the life of Osirmose.


This is the first evidence on the use of oral surgeries in Ancient Egypt. The studied mummy belongs to the Royal Museum of Art and History in Belgium.


Osirmose lived during the 25th dynasty, and was a member of a prominent family of Thebes' priests. His mummy was among the memorabilia of the Swedish Antiquarian Giovanni Anastasi, and was sold after his death at an auction to a Belgian antiquities collector, and then to the Royal Museum of Art and History in Belgium.


During the study, published in the latest issue of the journal Ojs earlier this month, researchers at the Saint Luc University performed a virtual autopsy on the Egyptian mummy using a three-dimensional (3D) high-resolution computed tomography (CT) scan. The taken images were later examined by a multidisciplinary team composed of radiologists, archaeologists, and oral and maxillofacial surgeons.


The researchers confirmed the mummy belonged to a man. They found the heart, aorta, and kidneys inside the mummy's body. Brain excerebration was performed, and artificial eyes were added above the stuffing of eye globes.


The teeth decay was more obvious in the upper maxilla, where the researchers discovered several anomalies including a rectangular hole on the palatine side of tooth n°26. The palatine root of tooth n°26 was missing.


Based on these findings, the researchers believe that this study provides the first evidence of a tooth removal site, and of oral surgery procedures previously conducted in old Egyptian embalmed mummy.


Archaeologists remove the cover of an intact sarcophagus inside a tomb in Luxor, Egypt. Reuters file photo

A virtual autopsy of the Osirmose's mummy, the doorkeeper of the Temple of Re, revealed several medical interventions in the mouth area that likely took place throughout the life of Osirmose.


This is the first evidence on the use of oral surgeries in Ancient Egypt. The studied mummy belongs to the Royal Museum of Art and History in Belgium.


Osirmose lived during the 25th dynasty, and was a member of a prominent family of Thebes' priests. His mummy was among the memorabilia of the Swedish Antiquarian Giovanni Anastasi, and was sold after his death at an auction to a Belgian antiquities collector, and then to the Royal Museum of Art and History in Belgium.


During the study, published in the latest issue of the journal Ojs earlier this month, researchers at the Saint Luc University performed a virtual autopsy on the Egyptian mummy using a three-dimensional (3D) high-resolution computed tomography (CT) scan. The taken images were later examined by a multidisciplinary team composed of radiologists, archaeologists, and oral and maxillofacial surgeons.


The researchers confirmed the mummy belonged to a man. They found the heart, aorta, and kidneys inside the mummy's body. Brain excerebration was performed, and artificial eyes were added above the stuffing of eye globes.


The teeth decay was more obvious in the upper maxilla, where the researchers discovered several anomalies including a rectangular hole on the palatine side of tooth n°26. The palatine root of tooth n°26 was missing.


Based on these findings, the researchers believe that this study provides the first evidence of a tooth removal site, and of oral surgery procedures previously conducted in old Egyptian embalmed mummy.


--   Sent from my Linux system.

Tuesday, April 27, 2021

Northern Cal. Egyptology Lecture May 2 - The Life and Deeds of Luigi Vassalli: Painter, Patriot and Egyptologist






The American Research Center in Egypt, Northern California Chapter, and the Near Eastern Studies Department, University of California, Berkeley, invite you to attend a virtual lecture by Dr. Francesco Tiradritti, Director, Italian Archaeological Mission to Luxor



The Life and Deeds of Luigi Vassalli: Painter, Patriot and Egyptologist

When: Sunday, May 2, 2021, 3 PM Pacific Time

Zoom Lecture. A registration link will be automatically sent to ARCE-NC members. Non-members may request a registration link by sending email with your name and email address to arcencZoom@gmail.com. Attendance is limited, so non-members, please send any registration requests no later than April 30.

Glenn Meyer
Publicity Director

About the Lecture:
May 30
Luigi Vassalli (photo courtesy Wikimedia Commons)

Luigi Vassalli was born in 1812 in Milan. In 1828 he enrolled at the Brera Academy and around this period he joined the Mazzinian activism but after a failed conspiracy he was sentenced to death, only to be pardoned but exiled. He moved in several places across Europe and later he traveled to Egypt where he began working for the local government.

In 1848 Vassalli returned to his homeland to join the revolutionary movements against the Austrian Empire, but after the failure he returned to Egypt where he became a portrait painter and an archaeological guide for wealthy foreigners. Around 1858 he was appointed Inspector of excavations by the French Egyptologist Auguste Mariette, who was Director of Antiquities at this time. Vassalli assisted in excavations at Giza and Saqqara until 1860, when he returned home to give his contribution to the Expedition of the Thousand led by Giuseppe Garibaldi. After the victory he was appointed First Class Conservator at the Naples National Archaeological Museum; however, the office was soon abolished by the still pro-Borbonic museum management and Vassalli again came back to Cairo.

In Egypt he made several archaeological explorations in many sites such as Tanis, Saqqara, Dendera and Edfu from 1861 to 1868. He sent many mummy remains to the Museo Civico di Storia Naturale of Milan and in 1871 he made around 150 casts from monuments exhibited in the Bulaq Museum which he brought to Florence with him. During his short stay here the Italian government asked him to inspect many Egyptian collections in Italy, after which he returned to his duties in Cairo.

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/f/f7/OiesdeMeidoum.JPGMeidum geese, museum of Cairo. Dimensions: 160 x 24 cm. Image courtesy Wikimedia Commons.

Still in 1871, along with Mariette he discovered the mastaba of Nefermaat at Meidum, which is well known for the famous scene commonly referred as the "Meidum geese". Vassalli carefully removed the whole scene from the tomb wall and reassembled it inside the Bulaq Museum. This fact sparked a controversy over a century later in  2015, when  the Egyptologist Francesco Tiradritti suggested that the Meidum geese scene is a 19th-century forgery possibly made by Vassalli himself, a claim disputed  by Egyptian authorities, among them Zahi Hawass.

After Mariette's death in 1881, Vassalli became interim director until the installation of Gaston Maspero. He retired in 1884 and returned to Milan and then to Rome, where he committed suicide on June 13, 1887.

Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Luigi_Vassalli
 
About the Speaker:



Dr. Francesco Tiradritti (Photo from francetvinfo.fr)


Francesco Tiradritti was born in Montepulciano, Italy, on August 17th, 1961. He is currently Director of the Italian Archaeological Mission to Luxor, where he is working in the Funerary Complex of Harwa (TT 37) and Akhimenru (TT 404) and the Tomb of Pabasa (TT 279). He received his PhD at the University of Rome "La Sapienza" with a doctoral thesis on the Propaganda on Royal Stelae of the XX Dynasty. He also obtained a D.E.A. at the University La Sorbonne in Paris.

Dr. Tiradritti has taken part in excavations in Italy, in the Sudan and at a several sites in Egypt – including the Tomb of Sheshonq (TT 27) and at Gebelein. He has worked for many years as consulting Egyptologist at the Civiche Raccolte Archeologiche of Milan. Additionally he has taught Egyptology in Enna, Naples, Foggia, Turin and at the University of Ljubljana in Slovenia. In 2004-2005 Dr. Tiradritti occupied the Dorothy K. Hohenberg Chair of Excellence in History of Art at the University of Memphis in Memphis, Tennessee. In 2013 he was scholar at the Getty Research Institute. He has been a member of the commission for the feasibility study of the Grand Egyptian Museum at Giza and for the renovation project of the Egyptian Museum in Turin. He has organized and worked on more than twenty exhibitions on various aspects of ancient Egyptian civilization in Italy, Hungary, Slovenia, Spain, Switzerland, Czech Republic and in Egypt.

He is the author of Ancient Egypt: Art, Architecture and History, published in 2002 in Italian, English, Spanish, & Chinese, and Egyptian Wall Paintings, published in 2008 in Italian, French, German, & English. Dr. Tiradritti is also the editor of Egyptian Treasures from the Egyptian Museum of Cairo, published in 1999 and translated into thirteen languages between 1998 and 2000. He has authored several scientific publications on Egyptology and Sudanese archaeology, and regularly writes for "The Art Newspaper" and "Archeologia Viva".

Dr. Triadritti's research focuses primarily on a semantic approach to archaeology, history of art and the culture of ancient Egypt.

About ARCE-NC:

For more information, please visit https://facebook.com/NorthernCaliforniaARCE/, https://arce-nc.org/, https://twitter.com/ARCENCPostings, or https://khentiamentiu.org. To join the chapter or renew your membership, please go to https://www.arce.org/become-arce-member and select "Berkeley, CA" as your chapter when you sign up.

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