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Monday, October 5, 2015

Egyptians turn to Traditional Chinese medicine to address health problems


http://www.channelnewsasia.com/news/world/egyptians-turn-to/2171928.html

Egyptians turn to Traditional Chinese medicine to address health problems

As Egypt's leaders struggle to find solutions to ongoing economic and political crises, health risks to both rich and poor have increased considerably, and it is in this climate that ancient Asian healing techniques are starting to make a modern day comeback.

CAIRO: Not too far from the great pyramids of Giza, lies an oasis for Asian martial arts and healing techniques.
'Meshkah' is Arabic for 'lantern' and was set up by Taha Hassouna to teach various marital arts and offer healing sessions using Traditional Chinese procedures.
After years of training in Egypt, Taha Hassouna studied the marital art of Qi Gong in China as well as acupuncture and hypnosis before deciding to delve deeper into the traditional holistic approach that combines physical exercise with the body's general well-being.
"Marital arts and healing were always the same, people used to know how to fight and how to heal,” said the martial arts trainer and healer. “When you understand the one you understand the other somehow."
Taha’s centre has become a haven for a growing number of patients seeking an alternative approach to the country’s much criticised health care system.
He is not the only practitioner.
Mayssa Sultan received a master’s degree from Yo San University in Los Angeles licensing her to practice acupuncture and herbology.
A typical first session starts with a diagnosis followed by 'Pulsing' which looks at the pattern, intensity and rate of the heartbeat. Needles are inserted according to the patient's needs and typically left for 20 minutes.
"I find the experience here to be very similar to the experience in the West where people have either heard about it and are somewhat educated about Chinese medicine and what it does and what it’s good for, or they are desperate and have tried everything," said Mayssa.
Chinese medicine dates thousands of years and although some of its techniques were actually used in ancient Egypt, these days only a handful of traditional healers carry on the practice.
It is hard to imagine that Asian healing can be found in Cairo, but passionate individuals like Mayssa and Taha are bringing this knowledge to Egyptians, who they say have a growing interest in Asian medicine and healing.
Angie Rouchemont has been receiving acupuncture treatment and practicing Qi Gong for more than a decade to maintain her good health.
"It's really relaxing like you have time to concentrate on your body and feeling the energy through your entire body while the acupuncturist is working on you,” she said. “Right after that I just want to sleep. It's like you are totally releasing all the tensions from your body and your body is doing the rest.”
As Egypt's leaders struggle to find solutions to ongoing economic and political crises, health risks to both the rich and poor have increased considerably. It is in this climate that ancient Asian healing techniques are starting to make a modern day comeback.