ARCENCPostings

Thursday, January 5, 2017

AWOL - The Ancient World Online: Open Access Journal: The Journal of Ancient Egyptian Architecture

http://ancientworldonline.blogspot.com/2016/06/forthcoming-open-access-journal-journal.html
Charles Jones wrote:
> The Journal of Ancient Egyptian Architecture <http://www.egyptian-architecture.com/>
> ISSN: 2472-999X
>
> The Journal of Ancient Egyptian Architecture is a scientific, open access
> and annual periodical. Its purpose is to promote the publication of research
> devoted to Ancient Egyptian architecture (domestic, civil, military,
> ritual/religious and funerary), from the Predynastic Period to the Roman
> imperial era, whatever the modern geographical context (Egypt, Sudan, Near
> East, etc). The subject scope includes everything relating to construction,
> regardless of its original importance or purpose.
>
> The journal publishes fieldwork reports and studies undertaken in the
> Egyptological tradition, including discussions of epigraphy and iconography,
> but also work that utilizes specific skills such as structural and materials
> sciences, or modern investigative techniques. In this way, /JAEA/ seeks to
> encourage the development of detailed technical descriptions, and deeply
> theorized understanding (of architectural symbolism, propaganda, climatic
> and geological influences, etc.). This interdisciplinary approach will help
> connect adjacent areas of expertise which, alone, could not reflect the
> richness and complexity of the Ancient Egyptian built heritage.
>
> The periodical welcomes any study that meets any one of these goals, only on
> the condition that the formatting and content of articles are subject to
> /JAEA/ scientific publication requirements.
>
> Volume 1 (2016) is complete
>
> <http://www.egyptian-architecture.com/JAEA1/JAEA1-2016.pdf>
>
>
> Download the full volume
> <http://www.egyptian-architecture.com/JAEA1/JAEA1-2016.pdf>
>
> <http://www.egyptian-architecture.com/JAEA1/JAEA1-2016.pdf>
>
>
> 27 Downloads <http://www.egyptian-architecture.com/JAEA1/JAEA1-2016.pdf>
>
> <http://www.egyptian-architecture.com/JAEA1/JAEA1-2016.pdf>
> <http://www.egyptian-architecture.com/JAEA1/JAEA1-2016.pdf>
>
>
> The use of the 'ceremonial' cubit rod as a measuring tool. An explanation
> (p. 1)
>
>
> Fr. Monnier, J.-P. Petit & Chr. Tardy
>
> This article deals with data inscribed on Ancient Egyptian cubit rods, and
> more specifically on the ceremonial cubit rods. Following a description of
> their technical and symbolic aspects, the paper reveals a property of the
> fine subdivisions engraved on the graduated part of these objects, and
> demonstrates that they could have allowed the cubits to be used as very
> accurate measuring rulers for architectural drawings and craft works.
>
>
> Published 22 July 2016 11794 Views 517 Downloads
>
>
> Varieties and sources of sandstone used in Ancient Egyptian temples (p. 11)
>
>
> J. A. Harrell
>
> Sandstone was one of the principal building materials of ancient Egypt, and
> this paper provides an overview of the varieties and sources of sandstone
> used in temples and other monuments. Included are lists of all known
> sandstone temples and quarries with precise locations given for each along
> with their age and status, and additionally for the quarries, size and
> petrology. Three megascopic properties (grain size, bedding type, and color)
> and one microscopic property (total feldspar content) are assessed in terms
> of their usefulness in recognizing sandstone varieties and their sources.
>
>
> Published 26 August 2016 2624 Views 236 Downloads
>
>
> Biography of a Great Pyramid Casing Stone (p. 39)
>
>
> D. I. Lightbody
>
> In the collection of the National Museum of Scotland is a block of limestone
> that was once part of the outer face of the Great Pyramid of pharaoh Khufu.
> This article presents the results of a new study of the stone carried out in
> Edinburgh in April of 2013, with permission granted by National Museums
> Scotland. The stone was originally brought to Edinburgh in 1872 for Charles
> Piazzi Smyth who was interested to study the principles of its dimensions
> and proportions. This new study demonstrates that when appropriately
> investigated, the stone reveals significant information about its original
> position on the Great Pyramid, as well as information regarding the Ancient
> Egyptians' own systems of measurement and architectural construction. The
> article also addresses the symbolic significance of the principal dimensions
> of this stone, and the monument on which it was placed.
>
>
> Published 24 September 2016 1232 Views 118 Downloads
>
>
> A look through his window: the sanctuary of the divine Apis Bull at
> Memphis (p. 57)
>
>
> N. Marković
>
> The divine Apis bulls were kept, lived, died, and were prepared for burial
> within the building complex known as the Place of Apis, somewhere in the
> vicinity of the main temple of Ptah at Memphis. Unfortunately, its exact
> location and layout are yet to be identified on site since large parts of
> the Ptah temple enclosure today lie under the modern settlement of Mit
> Rahina. Yet, since the Place of Embalmment has already been discovered in
> the south-western corner of the Ptah temple precinct, the rest of the
> sanctuary must have been located nearby. The purpose of this article is to
> propose a completely new layout for the sanctuary of Apis based on all
> available source material in order to connect parts of the burial ritual,
> known as the Apis Embalming Ritual, with actual localities inside the
> sanctuary itself.
>
>
> Published 1 November 2016 1055 Views 112 Downloads
>
>
> Les constructions axiales thoutmosides devant le 4^e pylône de Karnak (p. 71)
>
>
> F. Larché
>
> Hatshepsut Ma'atkare spectacularly monumentalized the two main entrances to
> the temple of Karnak. To the south she built the 8^th pylon, and to the west
> the 4^th pylon as well as a pylon further to the west which has not
> survived. After her disappearance, Thutmosis III transformed both of these
> entrances. He had the 7^th pylon erected on the southern entry way, and this
> article proposes that he also installed two pairs of obelisks to the west,
> between the 4^th pylon and the obelisks already erected by Hatshepsut
> Ma'atkare (with the name of Tuthmosis II). The analysis indicates that this
> transformation was completed by his successor Amenhotep II, who also built a
> calcite chapel between the two pairs of obelisks. This chapel was in turn
> dismantled by his son, Thutmosis IV, at the time of the construction of his
> portico court.
>
>
> Published 28 November 2016 511 Views 91 Downloads
>
>
>
> Submissions are open for the 2017 issue !
>
> See AWOL's full List of Open Access Journals in Ancient Studies
> <http://ancientworldonline.blogspot.co.uk/2015/12/alphabetical-list-of-open-access.html>
>


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