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Wednesday, March 16, 2016

Prehistoric graffiti unearthed west of Aswan | Cairo Post


http://thecairopost.youm7.com/news/199420/news/prehistoric-graffiti-unearthed-west-of-aswan

Prehistoric graffiti unearthed west of Aswan

Grafitti discovered near the tombs of the nobles, west bank of Aswa. Antiquities Ministry facebook page. (3)

CAIRO: A number of prehistoric (before 3200 B.C.) inscriptions and paintings were unearthed at the tombs of nobles in the west bank of Aswan, Antiquities Minister Mamdouh al Damaty announced Wednesday.

“This discovery is extremely unique because it indicates this area was inhabited by ancient Egyptians thousands of years ago. It also indicates there are still more to be discovered in the west bank of Aswan,” Damaty said in a statement released on the ministry’s Facebook page Wednesday.

Grafitti discovered near the tombs of the nobles, west bank of Aswa. Antiquities Ministry facebook page. (2)

 

The inscriptions were discovered in the area of Koba el-Hawa, where there are several tombs for the rulers of Aswan during the Middle Kingdom Period (2000 B.C.-1700B.C.), said Damaty.

He added the new discovery is attributed to an archaeology mission of Germany’s University of Bonn currently excavating in the area.

Grafitti discovered near the tombs of the nobles, west bank of Aswa. Antiquities Ministry facebook page.

Grafitti discovered near the tombs of the nobles, west bank of Aswa. Antiquities Ministry facebook page.

 

“The inscriptions and paintings represent wild animals such as gazelles, ibex, oxen, cows as well as religious rituals scenes of giraffes and ostriches,” said Mahmoud Afifi, Head of the ministry’s Ancient Egyptian Department.

Grafitti discovered near the tombs of the nobles, west bank of Aswa. Antiquities Ministry facebook page.

 

“The discovered paintings also represent hunting scenes. They show how the early humans who lived in this area managed to control the wildlife,” said Amt Hawary, head of the German archaeology mission.

Grafitti discovered near the tombs of the nobles, west bank of Aswa. Antiquities Ministry facebook page.

 

The area of the newly discovered inscriptions was called Ta Si and its capital was the island of Abu, known in Greek as Elephantine, archaeologist Sherif al-Saban told The Cairo Post Wednesday.

This area includes a number of exceptional tombs, such as the tomb of King Horekhof also known as the only ruler that documented his autobiography, works, and voyages on the walls of his tomb. There is also the tomb of King Hakanb I whose temple was discovered by Egyptian archaeologist Labib Habashi in the beginning of the 20th century, according to Sabban.