ARCENCPostings

Saturday, September 18, 2021

Egyptian archaeologists unearth collection of religious ritual tools at Temple of Pharaohs north of Cairo - Ancient Egypt - Heritage - Ahram Online

https://english.ahram.org.eg/NewsContent/9/40/423305/Heritage/Ancient-Egypt/Egyptian-archaeologists-unearth-collection-of-reli.aspx

Egyptian archaeologists unearth collection of religious ritual tools at Temple of Pharaohs north of Cairo

The discovery is important because it includes the tools that were actually used in performing the daily religious rituals for goddess Hathor

Nevine El-Aref , Saturday 18 Sep 2021
Pharaohs Hill temple in Kafr Al-Sheikh
Egyptian archaeologists have unearthed a collection of ancient tools that were used in religious rituals from the Temple of the Pharaohs (Boto) in Kafr El-Sheikh governorate north of Cairo.

The new discovery comes as part of an archaeological excavations plan carried out by Egypt's Supreme Council of Antiquities at different sites.

Mustafa Waziri, the council's secretary general, said the find is important because it includes the tools that were actually used in performing the daily religious rituals for goddess Hathor.

The instruments include a part of a limestone pillar in the form of goddess Hathor, and a group of incense burners made of faience, one of them decorated with the head of god Horus,

They also include a group of clay vessels that were used in religious and ceremonial rituals of goddess Hathor, a collection of statuettes depicting deities Tawart and Djehuty, a small maternity chair, a large offering holder, a pure gold Udjat eye, and the remains of golden scales used in the gilding of some other pieces.

Aymen Ashmawy, head of the Ancient Egyptian Antiquities Sector, pointed out the archeologists also discovered a wonderful group of ivory depicted scenes of women carrying offerings, scenes of the daily life, including plants, birds and animals, a large limestone lintel with hieroglyphic texts, along with a part of a royal painting of a king performing religious rituals in the temple. 

Hieroglyphic inscriptions bearing the five titles of King Psamtik I, and the names of the two kings "Waha Ip-Ra" and "Ahmose II" of the 26th dynasty kings were also uncovered.

Hossam Ghoneim, director general of Kafr El-Sheikh antiquities and head of the mission, said that a large limestone well for sacred water and a mud brick Ptoleimaic bath consists of a bathtub, a water basin and a place for heating water were also discovered.

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Friday, September 17, 2021

Egypt's ‘Ushabti’ figures open to visitors for 1st time in western Turkey

https://www.yenisafak.com/en/world/egypts-ushabti-figures-open-to-visitors-for-1st-time-in-western-turkey-3580470

Egypt's 'Ushabti' figures open to visitors for 1st time in western Turkey

2,700-year-old Ushabti statuettes, found in archaeological excavations in Turkey, used in funeral rituals in Egypt

News Service
AA

The 2,700 year-old "Ushabti" statuettes used in funeral rituals in Egypt and found in archaeological excavations in western Turkey, began to be exhibited for the first time at an archeology museum in the Aegean Izmir province.

Ushabti figures, small statuettes made of wood, stone, or faience, are often found in large numbers in ancient Egyptian tombs.

Three ceramic Ushabti figurines found in Anatolia meet their guests in Izmir Archeology Museum.

Aiming to introduce a different artifact to local and foreign visitors every month, Izmir Archeology Museum has brought the breezes of the Nile River to Turkey this September.

The statuettes were transferred from Istanbul Archeology Museum to Izmir Archeology Museum in the 1930s.

It is believed that the statuettes were buried in tombs in Egypt with the aim of serving their owners as slaves in the afterlife.

Preserved for about 80 years in the warehouses of Izmir Archaeological Museum, the figurines indicate longstanding commercial and cultural relations between Egypt and Anatolia.

The figurines, with hieroglyphic inscriptions saying "ready for calls of duty of gods," will remain open to visitors in the treasury hall of the Izmir Archaeological Museum until the end of the month.

"We know that Anatolia and Egypt had very important deep-rooted relations in the fields of politics, culture, art, and trade in every period of history," Hunkar Keser, the director of Izmir Archaeological Museum, told Anadolu Agency.


* Writing by Zehra Nur Duz in Ankara

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The Sedeinga Pyramids - HeritageDaily - Archaeology News

https://www.heritagedaily.com/2021/09/the-sedeinga-pyramids/141379

The Sedeinga Pyramids

The Sedeinga Pyramids is a concentration of 80 small pyramids, constructed between the second and third cataracts on the west bank of the Nile Valley in Middle Nubia, near Sedeinga, Sudan.

Sedeinga served as a regional capital during the Kingdom of Kush, an ancient African kingdom located in Nubia, encompassing the areas between present-day central Sudan and southern Egypt.

This region was home to three periods of Kushite development through antiquity. The first had its capital based at Kerma (2600 to 1520 BC), which was Nubia's first centralised state with an indigenous form of architecture and burial customs.

 

The second was centred on Napata (1000–300 BC), with the last kingdom being centred at Meroë (300 BC to AD 300). Both later Kingdoms saw a close influence develop from the customs and burial practices of Ancient Egypt.

Although isolated from the greater part of Kush, Sedeinga connected the Kingdom directly with Middle Egypt, likely serving as a centre of trade along an ancient trade route.

The pyramid site consists of thousands of burial chambers, and the surviving bases of 80 pyramids that date from the late Meroitic period. The largest pyramids are 22 feet wide at their base, with the smallest example likely constructed for the burial of a child, being only 30 inches wide.

sed1
Temple of Queen Tiyi – Image Credit : Laurent de Walick – CC BY 2.0
 

Pyramid burial was generally reserved for royalty, but the pyramids at Sedeinga was constructed mainly for the wealthy elite, exhibiting architectural features that has a greater Egyptian influence, typified by capstones depicting birds or lotuses emerging from solar discs.

During the 18th dynasty, the Egyptians controlled Nubia as far south as the 4th cataract on the Nile River. A temple was constructed at Sedeinga in dedication to Queen Tiye, the royal wife of Pharaoh Amenhotep III who had alleged Nubian origins. This temple was the female counterpart to the great temple Amenhotep III built nearby in Soleb for his own divine image and for Amun.

Header Image Credit : Laurent de Walick – CC BY 2.0

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Thursday, September 16, 2021

Egypt’s tomb of King Djoser reopens after 15-year closure

https://www.arabnews.com/node/1928616/middle-east

Egypt's tomb of King Djoser reopens after 15-year closure

Egypt's tomb of                        King Djoser reopens after 15-year closure
Saqqara, entrace to the funerary complex of Djoser. (File: Reuters)
Updated 14 September 2021
307
  • Major restoration work on pharaoh's tomb started in 2006
  • Egyptian minister, invited guests mark completion of work with special ceremony

CAIRO: The tomb of an ancient Egyptian pharaoh has been reopened to visitors after being closed for 15 years.

The completion of restoration work on the southern tomb of King Djoser in Saqqara was marked at a special ceremony attended by the Egyptian Minister of Tourism and Antiquities Khaled El-Anany and a group of invited guests.

Access to the tomb in the Saqqara burial site south of Cairo is via a stone staircase leading to a door carved in the rock and then an entrance corridor with another stone staircase to the cemetery door. More internal corridors lead on to burial spaces and murals decorated with Egyptian blue faience.

The tomb has a well at the end of it and a burial room containing a huge pink granite sarcophagus. The blue faience walls of numerous other corridors are decorated with fake doors bearing the image of the king and his titles.

The cemetery restoration project began in 2006 and included engineering, geotechnical, geo-environmental, and archaeological studies.

Along with the restoration of the lower corridors, work was carried out to strengthen walls and ceilings, repair cracks, and install faience tiles.

The granite sarcophagus at the bottom of the burial well was reassembled and restored, new lighting added, the cemetery floors paved, and a ladder put in leading to the well and the cemetery.

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Wednesday, September 15, 2021

ARCE-NC Egyptology Lecture Oct. 10 - Constructing the Sacred: Exploring the Ritual Landscape of Saqqara in 3D


The American Research Center in Egypt, Northern California Chapter, and the Near Eastern Studies Department, University of California, Berkeley, invite you to attend a virtual lecture by Dr. Elaine Sullivan, UC Santa Cruz:


Constructing the Sacred: Exploring the Ritual Landscape of Saqqara in 3D


When: Sunday, October 10, 2021, 3 PM Pacific Time

Zoom Lecture. A registration link will be automatically sent to ARCE-NC members. Non-members may request a registration link by sending email with your name and email address to arcencZoom@gmail.com. Attendance is limited, so non-members, please send any registration requests no later than Friday, October 8.

Glenn Meyer
ARCE-NC Publicity Director

 

About the Lecture:

The ancient Egyptian necropolis of Saqqara was the burial place of kings, queens, priests, and elite officials during the entire Pharaonic Period (3000-332 BCE), and boasts some of the most spectacular architecture and art in Egypt. In her recently published "born-digital" monograph, Dr. Elaine Sullivan uses a 3D model that digitally "reconstructs" the original appearance of the ancient monuments and visualizes large-scale change over time at the cemetery, allowing the archaeologist to make a virtual visit to the site at various moments in time.  The digital model provides new insights into how royal and elite Egyptians created a special monumental landscape to guarantee their eternal life and power. In this talk, Sullivan will highlight some of the findings of her research into ritual sight and visibility at this important necropolis.  

 
About the Speaker:



 
Dr. Elaine Sullivan is Associate Professor in the Department of History at the University of California at Santa Cruz.  Before joining the faculty at UC Santa Cruz, she spent six years at the University of California at Los Angeles, as project Coordinator for both the NEH-funded Digital Karnak Project and the Keck Digital Cultural Mapping Program, which introduced students to Geographic Information Systems and other map-based digital applications. She has interned or worked at several museums before moving into an academic career, including the Metropolitan Museum of Art and the Walters Art Museum.

Dr. Sullivan has published widely on Egyptological and technological topics in both peer-reviewed and invited publications.  She has lectured throughout the United States, often focused on digital cultural mapping, transformative scholarship and geospatial renderings. Her field experience began in 1995 when she excavated in Israel, and includes work in Italy, Syria, and Luxor, Karanis, and Saqqara in Egypt. She received her Bachelor's degree in history from Duke University, including a semester in Egypt at The American University in Cairo, and her Masters and PhD from the Department of Near Eastern Studies and Art at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, Maryland. 


About ARCE-NC:

For more information, please visit https://facebook.com/NorthernCaliforniaARCE/, https://arce-nc.org/, https://twitter.com/ARCENCPostings, or https://khentiamentiu.org. To join the chapter or renew your membership, please go to https://www.arce.org/general-membership and select "Berkeley, CA" as your chapter when you sign up.

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Monday, September 13, 2021

GEM opens with 10-day festival debut of Opera Tutankhamun: Egyptologist - Egypt Independent

https://www.egyptindependent.com/gem-opens-with-10-day-festival-debut-of-opera-tutankhamun-egyptologist/

GEM opens with 10-day festival debut of Opera Tutankhamun: Egyptologist

Professor of Egyptology Ahmed Badran announced that the inauguration of the Grand Egyptian Museum is slated for November, and will witness the grand debut of the Opera Tutankhamun.

During a phone-in with TeN satellite channel, Badran said that the opening ceremony has been assigned to an international company specialized in organizing cultural events, and the opening will last over ten days.

The opening ceremony will be accompanied by cultural segments, including the debut of Opera Tutankhamun, which is written by Zahi Hawass, to be played in the Egyptian Opera House before the opening of the museum, he said.

The museum was supposed to open during November 2020, he said, but was postponed due to the coronavirus pandemic.

"For the first time in history, the complete collection of Tutankhamun will be displayed in one place, which is the Grand Egyptian Museum, as it was previously distributed between the Military Museum in the Citadel, the Egyptian Museum in Tahrir, and the Luxor Museum," he proclaimed.

Badran stated that the expansion of the museum's halls helps display the complete archaeological collections in one place.

Regarding visitation times, he explained: "The visitor has more than one option, the first is when they do not have enough time and takes a short tour through the short path to see the most important civilizational stages in ancient Egypt. If they have the time, they can takes the longer path where a visitor needs seven visits to finish all parts of the Grand Egyptian Museum."

Constructed on an area of approximately 500,000 square meters, the GEM is located just two kilometers from the pyramids of Giza, and will house the world's largest antiquities collection belonging to a single culture's heritage.

The GEM is set to showcase 5,000 relics from Tutankhamun's collection as well — including 2,000 artifacts that will be displayed for the first time.

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50 Years of the Wellcome Collection at Swansea and Beyond - The Media Line

https://themedialine.org/mideast-streets/50-years-of-the-wellcome-collection-at-swansea-and-beyond/

50 Years of the Wellcome Collection at Swansea and Beyond

Register here.

Free Zoom conference to mark fifty years since part of the Wellcome Collection arrived to Swansea University

About this event

On the 17th September 1971, 92 crates consisting of some 4,500 objects (mainly Egyptian) arrived to Swansea University. This was part of dispersal of the Egyptian material at the Wellcome Collection, which probably amassed somewhere in the region of 20,000 objects. To mark the fiftieth anniversary of this event, the Egypt Centre will be hosting a free three-day Zoom (Webinar) conference. The conference will focus on Wellcome's Egyptian and Sudanese collections, which were dispersed to numerous institutions following his death in 1936. It will feature talks and virtual handling sessions/tours by curators, collections managers, and researchers associated with the Wellcome material.

While tickets for this event are free, registration is required. There is also the option to make a donation to the Egypt Centre if you would like to support us. Once registered, you will receive an automated email from Eventbrite containing the Zoom link (at the bottom of the email). If you have not received this within 24 hours of booking, please contact Ken Griffin at k.griffin@swansea.ac.uk

Live closed captioning in English, Arabic, and Welsh will be available, thanks to the support of Wellcome Collection.

The programme for this event is presented below, with the times listed being BST (UK times).

Day 1: Wednesday 15 September

13.00–13.15: Introductory remarks and welcome address by Professor Paul Boyle, Vice-Chancellor of Swansea University

13.15–13.45: Ruth Horry (Collections Curator – Exhibitions, Wellcome Collection) – Henry Wellcome's Historical Medical Museum: an introduction to collecting, display and dispersals

13.45–14.15: Isabelle Vella Gregory (Deputy Director of the Jebel Moya excavations) – Piecing together the archaeological history of Jebel Moya, Sudan

14.15–14:45: Discussion panel with John Baines (Professor Emeritus at Oxford University) & Alan Lloyd (Professor Emeritus at Swansea University)

14:45–15.00: Break

15.00–15.30: Ken Griffin (Collections Access Manager of the Egypt Centre) – The Egyptian Collection of Sir Henry Wellcome

15.30–16.00: Stephanie Boonstra (Collections Manager at the Egypt Exploration Society) – Nefertiti lived there: a look at the 1930–31 EES excavation at Amarna

16.00–16.30: Frances Larson (author of An infinity of things: how Sir Henry Wellcome collected the world) – "A perfect whirl of delight": Winifred Blackman in Egypt

16.30–17.00: Rachel Barclay (Curator at Oriental Museum, Durham) – "Contained in tea chests with no lists or identification": the Wellcome Collection of Egyptology at the Oriental Museum, Durham University

Day 2: Thursday 16 September

13.00–13.30: Campbell Price (Curator of Egypt and Sudan, Manchester Museum) & Molly Osborne – Wellcome Material in Manchester

13.30–14.00: Ian Trumble (Curator of Archaeology, Egyptology and World Cultures, Bolton Museum) – The Wellcome Collection at Bolton Museum

14.00–14.30: Manchester Museum handling session/tour

14.30–15.00: Bolton Museum handling session/tour

15.00–15.15: Break

15.15–15.45: Lee Robert McStein (Technical Director at Monument Men) – The curious case of the Deir el-Bahari casts

16.45–16.15: Anna Garnett (Curator of the Petrie Museum), Kyle Jordan and Daniel Bailey – The Wellcome Collection and the Petrie Museum: Past and Present

16.15–16.45: Helen Strudwick (Senior Assistant Keeper – Egyptian Antiquities, The Fitzwilliam Museum) – Wellcome to the Fitzwilliam: the rediscovery of a collection of Egyptian objects in Cambridge

16.45–17.15: Selina Hurley (Curator of Medicine, The Science Museum) – Reviewing the Wellcome Egyptology material held on loan at the Science Museum

Day 3: Friday 17 September

13.00–13.30: Ashley Cooke (Lead Curator of Antiquities, World Museum Liverpool) – Rising from the ashes: how the Wellcome Collection came to the aid of Liverpool's war-torn museum

13.30–14.00: Carolyn Graves-Brown (Curator of the Egypt Centre) – From Wellcome to Swansea: the history of the Swansea Wellcome Collection

14.00–14.30: Swansea Wellcome Museum video recording from 1976

14.30–15.00: The Egypt Centre handling session/tour

15.00–15.15: Break

15.15–15.45: Alexandra Eveleigh (Collections Information Manager, Wellcome Collection) – Transcribe Wellcome: piecing together the Wellcome collections' diaspora

15.45–16.00: Ersin Hussein (Lecturer in Ancient History – Swansea University) – Launch of the Egypt and its Neighbours display

16.00–16.15: Dulcie Engel (Egypt Centre volunteer)- Kate's museum: transcribing the daybooks of Käthe Bosse Griffiths

16.15–16.45: Ken Griffin (Collections Access Manager of the Egypt Centre), Sam Powell (Director at Abaset Collections Ltd) & Tom Hardwick – Launch of a new online catalogue

16.45–17.15: Closing discussion

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Saturday, September 11, 2021

Northern Cal. ARCE Lecture Sunday September 12 - Hands unto Ethiopia: The First African Americans to Visit Nubia


The next virtual lecture provided by the Northern California chapter of ARCE is less than a day away. Dr. Jeremy Pope is an excellent lecturer, and you won't want to miss his talk tomorrrow at 3 pm Pacific Time, Sunday September 12.

Glenn

The American Research Center in Egypt, Northern California Chapter, and the Near Eastern Studies Department, University of California, Berkeley, invite you to attend a virtual lecture by Dr. Jeremy Pope, The College of William & Mary:

Hands unto Ethiopia: The First African Americans to Visit Nubia

When: Sunday, September 12, 2021, 3 PM Pacific Time

Zoom Lecture. A registration link will be automatically sent to ARCE-NC members. Non-members may request a registration link by sending email with your name and email address to arcencZoom@gmail.com.

Glenn Meyer
Publicity Director

About the Lecture:



Since at least the middle of the 18th century, people of African descent in the Americas have invoked ancient Nubia—the "Ethiopia" and "Cush" of the Bible—as exemplar of African history and signifier of a global racial identity. The prophecy in Psalm 68:31 that "Ethiopia shall soon stretch forth her hands unto God" became the shared slogan of political, religious, and literary movements on both sides of the Atlantic that are known collectively to historians as Ethiopianism. By 1902, Pauline Hopkins's serial novel, Of One Blood, would cast a fictional African American traveler to Nubia as the harbinger of Pan-African liberation and mutual uplift of Africans and African Americans.  

 

Yet no published study has ever analyzed—nor even documented—the experiences of the first African Americans who actually traveled to Nubia. This silence is all the more remarkable, because such analysis has been performed for the first Europeans, white Americans, and Canadian Iroquois visitors to Nubia. Dr. Pope's lecture will seek to fill this historiographical void by reconstructing the history of the first African American visitors to Nubia from their private correspondence, interviews with their descendants, and an unpublished essay on the African past that was penned by one of the travelers following his return to the United States.  

 

If the story of their transcontinental voyage has thus far escaped attention in the academy, this may be attributed in large part to the fact that it does not belong to the traditional source material of Egyptology, Nubiology, exploration, or Ethiopianism. The narrative of the first African Americans to travel to Nubia instead demonstrates how these disciplines and movements have intersected with histories of global politics, international commerce, and intellectual inquiry beyond the circle of professional scholars.
 
About the Speaker:




Dr. Jeremy Pope is Associate Professor in the Department of History at the College of William & Mary, where he is also a Faculty Affiliate in Classical Studies. Dr. Pope is a member of the editorial boards of History in Africa and 
African Archaeological Review and is the author of The Double Kingdom under Taharqo: Studies in the History of Kush and Egypt c. 690-664 BC ​(E.J. Brill, 2014). He has participated in archaeological excavations at Gebel Barkal in Sudan and at Karnak's Mut Precinct in Egypt.














About ARCE-NC:

For more information, please visit https://facebook.com/NorthernCaliforniaARCE/, https://arce-nc.org/, https://twitter.com/ARCENCPostings, or https://khentiamentiu.org. To join the chapter or renew your membership, please go to https://www.arce.org/become-arce-member and select "Berkeley, CA" as your chapter when you sign up.

Thursday, September 9, 2021

World Heritage Exhibitions Today Announces The Acquisition Of 3 Marquee Museum Exhibitions

https://finance.yahoo.com/news/world-heritage-exhibitions-today-announces-153000211.html

World Heritage Exhibitions Today Announces The Acquisition Of 3 Marquee Museum Exhibitions

·4 min read

Acquisition Cements World Heritage Exhibitions as the Industry Leader in Artifact-Based, Blockbuster Traveling Exhibits

FORT MYERS, Fla., Sept. 9, 2021 /PRNewswire/ -- World Heritage Exhibitions (WHE) today announced the acquisition of several world-class museum exhibitions into the organization's current offerings. These renowned touring properties include POMPEII: The Exhibition, Mummies of the World: The Exhibition, and Victoria the T. rex. The industry's top cultural institutions have proudly welcomed millions of patrons through the doors to marvel at the iconic relics displayed in these tent-pole productions. This acquisition marks the transition of one of the leading historically significant blockbuster exhibitions portfolios in the world. Coupled with the content WHE has in production, this now cements the company as one of the most influential touring exhibitors on the planet.

"These exhibitions provide an opportunity to share a piece of history with the world. It's a unique collection of exhibitions that has a tremendous track record at driving museum attendance across the globe," expressed World Heritage Exhibitions President, Anthony Tann. "The topics align with our current offerings seamlessly and round-out our portfolio of exhibition offerings unlike any available to the public today."

The acquisition comes on the heels of the recent announcements of two world-premiere events that WHE is producing:

  • Machu Picchu and the Golden Empires of Peru features the most significant collection of gold treasures from Andean history to ever tour the globe. The exhibition is debuting at the Boca Raton Museum of Art this October.

  • Ramses the Great and the Gold of the Pharaohs features 181 priceless Ancient Egyptian treasures and one-of-a-kind relics, many representing the exceptional pharaoh himself. The exhibition is debuting at the Houston Museum of Natural Science this November.

Both exhibitions in production are breaking down barriers of norms seen in the museum industry and are expected to be tremendously well received by the public.

"The industry is changing, and our team is at the forefront of these trends. Guests to museums and exhibitions today expect fully immersive experiences where you can truly feel the sights and sounds of these events, bringing you face-to-face with a moment captured in time," Tann continued. "We anticipate breathing a breath of new life into these already tremendously successful attractions that will allow visitors a chance to experience historical events in a way they never have before."

About the exhibitions acquired by WHE:

POMPEII: The Exhibition examines the lives of the residents of Pompeii before and after the catastrophic eruption of Mount Vesuvius in 79 AD through artifacts on loan from the prestigious Naples National Archaeological Museum in Italy. The exhibition features 8 body casts excavated from the site of Pompeii as well as 180 priceless artifacts.

Mummies of the World: The Exhibition brings visitors face-to-face with more than 125 real mummies and related artifacts from across the globe, providing a window into the lives of people from every region of the world and offering unprecedented insights into past cultures and civilizations. The exhibition will enthrall guests with dramatic displays of the mummies and their personal stories, as well as state-of-the-art multimedia stations that will take visitors on a 4,500-year journey to explore the mummies' history and origins as well as how they were created.

Victoria the T. rex is an experience 66 million years in the making. The exhibition's focal point, Victoria, is the largest and most complete, real touring T. rex skeleton in the world. This exhibition transports guests to a time when dinosaurs roamed the earth, bringing to life an important paleontological discovery and giving museum visitors the rare opportunity to visit the Cretaceous period, where Victoria's story unfolds in her natural habitat.

WHE plans to further usher this catalogue into an ever-evolving museum landscape. Their executive team and production staff were hand-picked for their decades of experience developing, refining, marketing, and touring the industry's top exhibitions.

"We've experienced rapid growth in recent months, expanding not only our roster of touring properties but also our team," Tann described. "Many of our staff cut their teeth in the museum industry and were pivotal in the success of these very exhibitions from their onset. Therefore, our team already knows these exhibitions and their fine lending institutions inside-and-out. We'll immediately be able to bring them to market with unprecedented fan fair. I don't think there is another team better equipped to ensure that these touring monuments to history are preserved and on display throughout the world's cultural institutions for years to come."

World Heritage Exhibitions, now the industry leader in artifact-based, blockbuster traveling exhibitions, is expected to continue to turn-heads with their proactive, new age approach to the industry.

For photos featuring the content included in these exhibitions, click here: https://www.dropbox.com/sh/5eayzei32uqjkqh/AADHMfSAP420bLDzHp7cBxYZa?dl=0

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Cision

View original content:https://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/world-heritage-exhibitions-today-announces-the-acquisition-of-3-marquee-museum-exhibitions-301372695.html

SOURCE World Heritage Exhibitions

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