ARCENCPostings

Monday, October 18, 2021

When Isis Was Queen - Archaeology Magazine

https://www.archaeology.org/issues/445-2111/features/10053-egypt-philae-temples

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Stanford AIA 10/29: Cedric Gobeil on "The Museo Egizio’s current research at Deir El-Medina"

Dr. Patrick Hunt, AIA Stanford Society President, has extended an invitation to ARCE-NC members to attend the following Zoom lecture by Dr. Cedric Gobeil. The chapter last heard Dr. Gobeil at an ARCE-NC talk at Stanford co-sponsored by Dr. Anne Austin some years back. You won't want to miss this lecture!

Note that registration is required. You can register by clicking on the underlined word "registration" below. If that doesn't work, follow this link: http://aia-stanford.org/CedricGobeil.html

Glenn

-----------------

Dr. Cedric Gobeil

"In the footsteps of Ernesto Schiaparelli. The Museo Egizio's current research at Deir El-Medina"


Dr. Gobeil  will be joining our Stanford AIA Chapter on Friday, October 29 at noon on zoom.
Lecture is free and open to the public; registration is required to receive a link.


Dr. Cédric Gobeil received his PhD in Egyptology at the Université Paris IV-Sorbonne in 2008. He joined the Institut Français d'Archéologie Orientale in Cairo as foreign scientific member specializing in Egyptian archaeology in 2008. He was awarded a two years postdoctoral fellowship from the Canadian Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council in 2010 and, in 2011, he was appointed Director of the French archaeological mission of Deir el-Medina (IFAO). Apart from his own excavations, he is also a member of the French missions of Coptos and Balat/Ayn Asil, as well as for the Great Hypostyle Hall Project. Dr. Gobeil is also adjunct professor in the History Department at the Université du Québec à Montréal.

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Friday, October 15, 2021

Queen Tiye: Astonishing Video Reimagining Her Face.. And First Picture of Her Temple | Al Bawaba

https://www.albawaba.com/entertainment/queen-tiye-astonishing-video-reimagining-her-face-and-first-picture-her-temple

Queen Tiye: Astonishing Video Reimagining Her Face.. And First Picture of Her Temple

Published September 19th, 2021 - 05:23 GMT

Queen Tiye: Astonishing Video Reimagining                          Her Face.. And First Picture of Her Temple

Queen Tiye is one popular Pharaoh up until this day, even 3,000 years after her death.

Since the Grand Mummies Royal Parade that took place last April in Egypt, the daughter of Yuya and Tjuya of the New Kingdom kind of stole the historical show, as she was among the twenty two mummies transferred from the Egyptian Museum in Tahrir Square in the Egyptian capital Cairo, to the National Museum of Civilization in the city of Fustat.

Reimagining The Face of Queen Tiye

An old video that was posted on Facebook on July 11 by Egypt Today Magazine has resurfaced again on social media.

The magazine captioned the footage: 'Video imagining the face of Queen Tiye went viral on social media.'

Adding: 'Social media users expressed their admiration with the accuracy of the imagination and the beauty of the ancient Egyptian queen.'

Followers left comments like:

'Am glad to be born in era were technology and science are capable of such things. We can now at least have an idea of what she might have looked like now, as well as other figures of the past.'

'Awesome! Do King Tut next!'

'This video is the reason why I dont hate technology and remind myself the good it can do.'

First Picture of Queen Tiye's Temple

Queen Tiye who had alleged Nubian origins, and the wife of Amenhotep III, one of Egypt's most successful rulers, has been dedicated a pyramid that was built in Sedeinga. During the 18th dynasty, the Egyptians controlled Nubia as far south as the 4th cataract on the Nile River. This temple was the female counterpart to the great temple Amenhotep III built nearby in Soleb for his own image and for Amun.

Queen Tiye temple Egypt mummy Pharaoh                            pyramid
Image Credit : Laurent de Walick – CC BY 2.0

Who Is Queen Tiye?

Queen Tiye is the daughter of Yuya and Tjuya of the New Kingdom and the wife of Amenhotep III, one of Egypt's most successful rulers.

Her mummy was discovered in 1898 in the Tomb of Amenhotep II (KV 35), in the Valley of the Kings, Luxor.

Who Is Queen Tiye
 
Queen Tiye's mummy was among the 22 royal mummies that were transferred in a royal parade from the Egyptian Museum in Tahrir to the National Museum of Egyptian Civilization on April 3.

Queen Tiye's hair became a meme on Facebook at the time of the Golden Parade because of her luscious curly locks, well preserved after more than 3,000 years.

It is also worth mentioning that the queen, mother to famous pharaoh Akhenaten, died at 60 years of age.

Queen Tiye Hair Routine

It's no secret the ancient Egyptians cared so much for their hair, and indeed had particular hair routines.

Combs, hair cream jars and curling tongs have been found in several tombs. Hair samples show that the Egyptians used castor oil, almond oil and scented oils, as well as animal fat to keep their curls in place and to protect the hair from Egypt's dry weather.

Scenes of women combing their hair or their daughters' hair are depicted on walls and papyrus.

Queen Tiye Hair Routine

dark secrets about Queen Tiye Hair

imagining queen tiye

queen tiye face reconstruction


© 2000 - 2021 Al Bawaba (www.albawaba.com)

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Queen Tiye: Astonishing Video Reimagining Her Face.. And            First Picture of Her Temple

Queen Tiye is one popular Pharaoh up until this day, even after 3,000 years of her death.

Since the Grand Mummies Royal Parade that took place last April in Egypt, the daughter of Yuya and Tjuya of the New Kingdom kind of stole the historical show, as she was among the twenty two mummies transferred from the Egyptian Museum in Tahrir Square in the Egyptian capital Cairo, to the National Museum of Civilization in the city of Fustat.

Reimagining The Face of Queen Tiye

An old video that was posted on Facebook on July 11 by Egypt Today Magazine has resurfaced again on social media.

The magazine captioned the footage: 'Video imagining the face of Queen Tiye went viral on social media.'

Adding: 'Social media users expressed their admiration with the accuracy of the imagination and the beauty of the ancient Egyptian queen.'

Followers left comments like:

'Am glad to be born in era were technology and science are capable of such things. We can now at least have an idea of what she might have looked like now, as well as other figures of the past.'

'Awesome! Do King Tut next!'

'This video is the reason why I dont hate technology and remind myself the good it can do.'

First Picture of Queen Tiye's Temple

Queen Tiye who had alleged Nubian origins, and the wife of Amenhotep III, one of Egypt's most successful rulers, has been dedicated a pyramid that was built in Sedeinga. During the 18th dynasty, the Egyptians controlled Nubia as far south as the 4th cataract on the Nile River. This temple was the female counterpart to the great temple Amenhotep III built nearby in Soleb for his own image and for Amun.

Queen Tiye temple Egypt mummy Pharaoh pyramid
Image Credit : Laurent de Walick – CC BY 2.0

Who Is Queen Tiye?

Queen Tiye is the daughter of Yuya and Tjuya of the New Kingdom and the wife of Amenhotep III, one of Egypt's most successful rulers.

Her mummy was discovered in 1898 in the Tomb of Amenhotep II (KV 35), in the Valley of the Kings, Luxor.

Who Is Queen Tiye
 
Queen Tiye's mummy was among the 22 royal mummies that were transferred in a royal parade from the Egyptian Museum in Tahrir to the National Museum of Egyptian Civilization on April 3.

Queen Tiye's hair became a meme on Facebook at the time of the Golden Parade because of her luscious curly locks, well preserved after more than 3,000 years.

It is also worth mentioning that the queen, mother to famous pharaoh Akhenaten, died at 60 years of age.

Queen Tiye Hair Routine

It's no secret the ancient Egyptians cared so much for their hair, and indeed had particular hair routines.

Combs, hair cream jars and curling tongs have been found in several tombs. Hair samples show that the Egyptians used castor oil, almond oil and scented oils, as well as animal fat to keep their curls in place and to protect the hair from Egypt's dry weather.

Scenes of women combing their hair or their daughters' hair are depicted on walls and papyrus.

Queen Tiye Hair Routine

dark secrets about Queen Tiye Hair

imagining queen tiye

queen tiye face reconstruction


© 2000 - 2021 Al Bawaba (www.albawaba.com)



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Egypt’s Min. of Tourism & Antiquities to launch mobile application for Egypt’s various tourist destinations - EgyptToday

https://www.egypttoday.com/Article/4/108574/Egypt%E2%80%99s-Min-of-Tourism-Antiquities-to-launch-mobile-application-for

Egypt's Min. of Tourism & Antiquities to launch mobile application for Egypt's various tourist destinations

BY

Wed, 06 Oct 2021 - 01:56 GMT

The beauty of the Egyptian Nile - Egypt Tours          Portal

The beauty of the Egyptian Nile - Egypt Tours Portal

CAIRO – 6 October 2021: Egypt's Minister of Tourism & Antiquities Khaled El-Enani held a meeting on October 6 to follow up on the latest updates of the mobile application the ministry intends to launch soon to promote the Egyptian tourist destinations locally and globally.

During the meeting, the designs of the first phase of the application were reviewed. The application aims to introduce the Egyptian and foreign visitors to the different activities, products, and landmarks, as well as the cultural, artistic, environmental and marine activities of the countless Egyptian tourist destinations.

This service is going to make it much easier for anyone seeking to spend a holiday in Egypt to find the right place that caters to their needs, as it gathers all the unique tourist destinations in Egypt in one place, saving the time and effort required to manually search for the right destination.

The application will also provide electronic reservation of visit tickets for some museums and archaeological sites as a first stage in preparation for the inclusion of the rest of the sites.

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Egypt concludes 1st phase of restoration project in Great Hypostyle Hall in Karnak temple - Egypt Independent

https://www.egyptindependent.com/egypt-concludes-1st-phase-of-restoration-project-in-great-hypostyle-hall-in-karnak-temple/

Egypt concludes 1st phase of restoration project in Great Hypostyle Hall in Karnak temple

The Secretary-General of the Supreme Council of Antiquities, Mostafa Waziri announced on Wednesday that the first phase of the restoration of the Great Hypostyle Hall in Karnak has been completed.

He explained that the development work turned the hall into an architectural and artistic masterpiece, with its red, yellow, blue and green colors restored.

Waziri noted that this work is being carried out under the patronage of Prime Minister Mostafa Madbouly, and with the full support of Tourism and Antiquities Minister Khaled al-Anany.

Egyptian restorers renovated the Great Hypostyle Hall to its beauty and splendor, by removing dirt, calcifications that had long since hid its colors.

He said that restoring the hall's colors will serve to attract tourists.

A total of 134 columns sit in the hall, each of which is about 20 meters high, Ghareeb Sonbol, a consultant for conservation and restoration at the Supreme Council of Antiquities, said. 

The restoration team at the Ministry of Tourism and Antiquities, in cooperation with a number of graduates of the restoration departments at Luxor and South Valley Universities and the Institute of Restoration in Luxor also worked on restoring the columns in the Great Pillar Hall in Karnak temples and showing their original colors.

Edited translation from Al-Masry Al-Youm

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In Photos: Restoration underway on ram heads discovered at Karnak Temple - Ancient Egypt - Antiquities - Ahram Online

https://english.ahram.org.eg/News/426726.aspx

In Photos: Restoration underway on ram heads discovered at Karnak Temple

Nevine El-Aref , Monday 11 Oct 2021

Egyptian restorers are currently busy restoring the three ram heads unearthed at the Euergetes' gate in the southern part of Karnak Temple in Luxor.

Egypt
Mostafa Waziri, the secretary-general of the Supreme Council of Antiquities examining the rams' heads.

The artefacts were found during excavation works carried out as part of a project exploring the royal procession path known as the Sphinx Avenue in Luxor, which once connected Luxor to Karnak Temple.

The heads were part of three ram-headed sphinxes located on the Sphinx Avenue, and after restoration they will be re-attached to the ram bodies.

As part of the project, a series of photos relating the history of the path, since its early exploration in the 19th century until now, will be put on display along the avenue, according to Mostafa Waziri, the secretary-general of the Supreme Council of Antiquities.

Short link:

 

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Sunday, October 10, 2021

New YouTube video posted to Northern California ARCE channel.

In case you missed today's Northern California ARCE lecture, described below, I just posted it on YouTube, and you should have a look.
It's on the Northern California YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCtSkra1IMWntUDBqDjNO4sQ
The video itself is at: https://youtu.be/4OGMy9_pljU

Any questions or problems, send me an email at arcencZoom@gmail.com.

Glenn


The American Research Center in Egypt, Northern California Chapter, and the Near Eastern Studies Department, University of California, Berkeley, invite you to attend a virtual lecture by Dr. Elaine Sullivan, UC Santa Cruz:


Constructing the Sacred: Exploring the Ritual Landscape of Saqqara in 3D


When: Sunday, October 10, 2021, 3 PM Pacific Time

Zoom Lecture. A registration link will be automatically sent to ARCE-NC members. Non-members may request a registration link by sending email with your name and email address to arcencZoom@gmail.com. Attendance is limited, so non-members, please send any registration requests no later than Friday, October 8.

Glenn Meyer
ARCE-NC Publicity Director
 

About the Lecture:

The ancient Egyptian necropolis of Saqqara was the burial place of kings, queens, priests, and elite officials during the entire Pharaonic Period (3000-332 BCE), and boasts some of the most spectacular architecture and art in Egypt. In her recently published "born-digital" monograph, Dr. Elaine Sullivan uses a 3D model that digitally "reconstructs" the original appearance of the ancient monuments and visualizes large-scale change over time at the cemetery, allowing the archaeologist to make a virtual visit to the site at various moments in time.  The digital model provides new insights into how royal and elite Egyptians created a special monumental landscape to guarantee their eternal life and power. In this talk, Sullivan will highlight some of the findings of her research into ritual sight and visibility at this important necropolis.  

 
About the Speaker:



Dr. Elaine Sullivan is Associate Professor in the Department of History at the University of California at Santa Cruz.  Before joining the faculty at UC Santa Cruz, she spent six years at the University of California at Los Angeles, as project Coordinator for both the NEH-funded Digital Karnak Project and the Keck Digital Cultural Mapping Program, which introduced students to Geographic Information Systems and other map-based digital applications. She has interned or worked at several museums before moving into an academic career, including the Metropolitan Museum of Art and the Walters Art Museum.

Dr. Sullivan has published widely on Egyptological and technological topics in both peer-reviewed and invited publications.  She has lectured throughout the United States, often focused on digital cultural mapping, transformative scholarship and geospatial renderings. Her field experience began in 1995 when she excavated in Israel, and includes work in Italy, Syria, and Luxor, Karanis, and Saqqara in Egypt. She received her Bachelor's degree in history from Duke University, including a semester in Egypt at The American University in Cairo, and her Masters and PhD from the Department of Near Eastern Studies and Art at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, Maryland. 

About ARCE-NC:

For more information, please visit https://facebook.com/NorthernCaliforniaARCE/, https://arce-nc.org/, https://twitter.com/ARCENCPostings, or https://khentiamentiu.org. To join the chapter or renew your membership, please go to https://www.arce.org/general-membership and select "Berkeley, CA" as your chapter when you sign up.


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ARCE-NC Egyptology Lecture Nov. 14 - Development of the Royal Titulary as a Reflection of Important Prehistoric Sites

The American Research Center in Egypt, Northern California Chapter, and the Near Eastern Studies Department, University of California, Berkeley, invite you to attend a virtual lecture by Dr. Ronald J. Leprohon, University of Toronto:

Development of the Royal Titulary as a Reflection of Important Prehistoric Sites

When: Sunday,  November 14, 2021, 3 PM Pacific Time

Zoom Lecture. A registration link will be automatically sent to ARCE-NC members. Non-members may request a registration link by sending email with your name and email address to arcencZoom@gmail.com. Attendance is limited, so non-members, please send any registration requests no later than Friday, November 12.

Glenn Meyer
ARCE-NC Publicity Director


https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/a/a9/Egyptian_-_Model_of_a_Vulture_and_Uraeus_Seated_on_a_Basket_-_Walters_22264.jpg

Nebty Cobra and Vulture - Walters Art Museum #22.264. Limestone, circa 765 BC-AD 313 (Third Intermediate-Greco-Roman). Courtesy Wikimedia Commons.

About the Lecture:

Ever wonder what and who those two creatures decorating King Tutʼs headdress are? To answer our question, weʼll go back, way back, into the prehistoric periods, which will reveal an area usually — but perhaps wrongly — described as having two different material cultures, Upper Egyptian in the south and Lower Egyptian in the north.

As we journey through time, weʼll see the rise and fall of various cities and chiefdoms, ultimately leading to what is commonly referred as the "Unification of Upper and Lower Egypt" under one ruler. Weʼll have a look at how the ancients depicted these events and compare their version to the one offered by modern archaeologists.

The last portion of the presentation will demonstrate the various ways the rulers of the newly-formed country chose to represent themselves to their subjects, part of which exhibited a clever use of important prehistoric sites.

About the Speaker:


Dr. Ronald J. Leprohon graduated from Loyola College in Montréal (now Concordia University) in 1971, and received his Doctorate from the University of Toronto in 1980. He served as Education Officer and Project Egyptologist for the exhibition of the Treasures of Tutankhamun in Toronto in 1978-79. He has also done archaeological work in Egypt for both the Akhenaten Temple Project and the Dakhleh Oasis Project.

In 1981 he went to Cairo to become the first director of the Canadian Institute in Egypt, a branch of the Canadian Mediterranean Institute. He is Professor of Egyptology in, and past Chair of, the Department of Near and Middle Eastern Civilizations at the University of Toronto, and was the recipient of a University of Toronto Faculty of Arts and Science Outstanding Teaching Award in 2002-2003.

He has published close to 100 articles and reviews in scholarly journals, and has written a two‑volume study of the ancient Egyptian funerary stelae in the Boston Museum of Fine Arts. His book, The Great Name (Society of Biblical Literature, 2013), is a study of the three thousand-year history of the titulary of the pharaohs. 


About ARCE-NC:

For more information, please visit https://facebook.com/NorthernCaliforniaARCE/, https://arce-nc.org/, https://twitter.com/ARCENCPostings, or https://khentiamentiu.org. To join the chapter or renew your membership, please go to https://www.arce.org/general-membership and select "Berkeley, CA" as your chapter when you sign up.

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